Alice Claim

Ore Crusher

Ore Crusher

Along the way up the McClellan Butte trail you might stumble upon the remains of the mill site and adit of the Alice Claim… that is, you would have along the old trail.

Nowadays you’d probably only find it if you were looking for it.

The adit

The adit

The adit from the trail

The adit from the trail

At one time in the not so distant past, the trail up the butte passed right beside the claim, but now that trail has been abandoned in favor of another, and is slowly being reclaimed by nature.

Rusted "thing"

Rusted “thing”

Interestingly enough, hikers still pass right by the site, albeit on a different path, though I imagine only a few oddballs ever notice.

The abandoned trail and mill site are found along Alice Creek, which as a matter of interest was named Revington Creek during the time the Alice Claim was in operation.

Abandoned trail

Abandoned trail

The adit itself is collapsed and flooded in addition to being dug into steadily decaying overburden. Which is to say, even if this thing were open, it would be exceedingly dangerous to enter.

STAY OUT, STAY ALIVE!

Ore crusher detail

Ore crusher detail

According to Discovering Washington’s Historic Mines Vol.#1,  there once existed three tunnels totaling 500ft of underground workings. However, during my visit I only located the one.

El Crush-o

El Crush-o

A Seattle Times article from July 1900 stated that construction of a surface tram had begun at the claim, linking one of the adits to the mill site. At that time, the mine working machinery was already in operation and the milling equipment was on order. The capacity of this mill was said to handle 10 to 15 tons of ore per day.

Old wood pile

Old wood pile

Nowadays not much remains, though what does is impressive enough.

The first major artifact seems to be some sort of furna.. You know, honestly I have no idea what in the hell it was exactly, maybe a furnace/boiler something. It looks as though it handled high temperatures at one time, judging by the decaying wrap on the pipes and a mixture of ash and brick underneath it.

Moss toupee

Moss toupee

Feel free to school me on this one!

The second, and in my opinion, most impressive artifact is what I’m very certain is an ore crusher. It consists of three large metal pestles set in a large cylinder with an ore chute on one side. I imagine this thing was as loud as hell when it was running.

(The ore crusher is known as a Huntington Mill, designed by Frank Atwood Huntington, learn more about the man and his machine: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Atwood_Huntington)

Stove bits

Stove bits

Other artifacts include what appears to be a smashed wood stove and a pile of cut wood in addition to the miscellaneous corroding pipes, bars and various chunks of rusted metal that litter the site.

The Alice Claim is worth a visit for those of you interested in such things and luckily the star artifacts are too heavy to be carried off, so they will likely be there awhile. Though some jackass tagged one of them… yeah.

Anyway, as always, don’t be that jackass, leave it the way you found it.

Happy Trails, Harry Biped

Inside the Ore Crusher

Inside the Ore Crusher

References:

Woodhouse, Phil; Jacobson, Daryl; Petersen, Bill; Cady,Greg; Pisoni, Victor, Discovering Washington’s Historic Mines Vol.1: The West Central Cascade Mountains. Oso Publishing Company, 1997

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

5 responses to “Alice Claim

  1. I was up there about 15 years ago and the adit we found was just a depression with with a couple of timbers sticking up on each side. I wonder if it has collapsed father opening up what you found or someone tried to dig it out?

    Like

  2. That sounds like a cool place to visit. Can you give some clues on how to find it? I can’t find anything on the internet.

    Like

  3. Pingback: McClellan’s Butte 5162′ | harrybipedhiking·

  4. if u look closely u can make out possible cabin or building foundation right were the woodstove is.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s